I doubt a bit, but then I decided to try to submit a patch to JDK with the performance improvement. I’ve read couple articles, cloned code and realized that fromString implementation has been changed in JDK9 :)

The actual implementation of the fromString in JDK9 was made in the previous year (for this issue). So, let’s see what’s inside.

int len = name.length();
if (len > 36) {
    throw new IllegalArgumentException("UUID string too large");
}

int dash1 = name.indexOf('-', 0);
int dash2 = name.indexOf('-', dash1 + 1);
int dash3 = name.indexOf('-', dash2 + 1);
int dash4 = name.indexOf('-', dash3 + 1);
int dash5 = name.indexOf('-', dash4 + 1);

if (dash4 < 0 || dash5 >= 0) {
    throw new IllegalArgumentException("Invalid UUID string: " + name);
}

long mostSigBits = Long.parseLong(name, 0, dash1, 16) & 0xffffffffL;
mostSigBits <<= 16;
mostSigBits |= Long.parseLong(name, dash1 + 1, dash2, 16) & 0xffffL;
mostSigBits <<= 16;
mostSigBits |= Long.parseLong(name, dash2 + 1, dash3, 16) & 0xffffL;
long leastSigBits = Long.parseLong(name, dash3 + 1, dash4, 16) & 0xffffL;
leastSigBits <<= 48;
leastSigBits |= Long.parseLong(name, dash4 + 1, len, 16) & 0xffffffffffffL;

return new UUID(mostSigBits, leastSigBits);

As we can see, an implementation is almost like my implementation Step 3. In JDK9 was introduced the overload of parseLong:

long parseLong(CharSequence s, int beginIndex, int endIndex, int radix)

So, in the actual implementation of the fromString no allocation is performed (besides the creation of the new UUID class instance). And it should be ~2.5 times faster than the previous implementation, or maybe even faster if JIT is optimizing JDKs code more aggressively.

I think if I would submit an improvement by myself, I would make the same thing. Because it’s strange to have specific implementation of generic functions parseLong and Character.digit just for this class (more code — more support, more tests, more questions within a code review).

The time table for JDK9 will be:

Version    | Avg time, ns | Gain to previous | Gain to original
Original   |   130        | 0                | 0
Step 0     |   548        | -418             | -418
Step 1     |   529        |                  | -399
Step 2     |   247        | 282 (53%)        | -117
Step 3     |   126        | 121 (49%)        | 4 (1%)
Step 4     |   101        | 25 (20%)         | 29 (22%)
Step 5     |   109        | -8 (-8%)         | 21 (16%)
Final      |    78        | 31 (28%)         | 52 (40%)

Don’t forget, that performance in JDK9 will change many times prior to release (this test is performed with jdk-9-ea-bin-b91-linux-x64–04nov2015, the final release will be in September 2017). And after test you may realize that the “final” solution is faster but not really faster, just 40%.

Originally posted on Medium.